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COVID-19 Service Update & Office Hours

To Our Valued Patients and Community:

We are committed to the cleanliness of our practice and creating a safe environment for our patients, team, and community. We wish to ensure everyone that we are taking every precaution in our day to day operations to limit risks and reduce the spread of the virus in our community.

After much contemplation our office has made the decision to modify our eye care services going forward. We have closely followed the information released by the Center for Disease Control (CDC). In accordance with new CDC recommendations, all routine eye exams are postponed until further notice. We believe that these precautions are necessary and important to the health of our team, patients, and community.

To alleviate potential overflow in emergency rooms and urgent care centers, we want our community to be aware that we are available for all your emergent eye issues that may arise. This includes, eye pain, eye infections, possible foreign bodies, scratches on the eye, and any new onset of flashes of light or floaters.

Starting Monday, April 27th, we will be extending our limited hours with essential staff only. Patients will be able to pick-up their current glasses and contact lens orders, but we will utilize a curbside pick-up. Our office doors will remain locked, and we request that you call to have access to the office for scheduled appointments or to curbside pick up glasses and contacts. If you prefer, we can mail your glasses and contacts directly to you for a small fee. We realize that this may be an inconvenience, however, patient safety is the utmost priority.

  • Contacts: If you are in need of contact lenses and your prescription has expired, our doctors will provide a temporary 90-day extension of contact lens prescriptions for our current contact lens patients.
  • Glasses: If you are in urgent need of replacement glasses due to loss/breakage, we will continue to place eyeglass orders. If your eyeglass prescription has expired, our doctors may provide an extension of your most recent eyeglass prescription, or we may determine a new prescription when needed.

Appointment Protocol: If you have an appointment for medical or emergency eye care or optical services, we ask you to please:

  • Notify us prior to your visit if you have (or have had contact with anyone having) any signs of fever or respiratory illness or any international travel recently.
  • Attend your appointment alone, or when necessary you may have 1 person/driver accompany you. All other individuals should remain at home (or in your vehicle).
  • Utilize the hand washing stations.

Rest assured that we are diligently sanitizing every area of the office that comes in contact with anyone (patient or staff) and that we are prohibiting employees in the office if they have or been in contact with anyone having any sign of illness whatsoever.

We will assess and adapt our hours of operations as needed and will update you regarding any changes to our business practices moving forward.

Thank you for your patience and understanding. We appreciate your cooperation with the new measures being taken during this challenging time, and we are grateful for your trust in us as your eye care provider!

Current Limited Office Hours:

Monday, April 27th to Friday May 1st – 10 AM – 5 PM
Saturday May 2nd 9 AM – 1 PM

Monday, May 4th we plan to return to normal business hours.

Thank you and stay safe,
Dr. Roland Montemayor

Reader’s Choice Award

Readers Choice AwardWe are proud to have been selected for the Reader’s Choice Best of 2015 by the readers of the Fort Bend Herald as the Best Eyewear/Glasses in Fort Bend, and Reserve Grand Champion for Best Optometrist in Fort Bend.

Why Do We Need Glasses

The most well-known part of a comprehensive eye exam is the basic vision test. When you have a general vision test, one of the main conditions the eye care practitioner is checking for is a refractive error. A refractive error means there is an abnormality in the shape of the eye, changing the eye’s ability to focus light directly onto the retina.This causes blurred vision and can usually be corrected by wearing prescription eyeglasses, contact lenses and possibly, alternate treatments such as vision therapy, ortho-k, LASIK or refractive surgery such as LASIK.

The term, “refractive error” refers to a problem with the process of refraction that is responsible for sight. Normally, light rays that enter your eye are refracted or bent through the cornea and the lens, and ultimately converge or are focused onto a single point on the retina. From the retina, messages are sent through the optic nerve to the brain which then interprets these signals into the image that we are seeing.

In order for this process to work effectively, the anatomy of the eye including the length of the eye and the curvature of the cornea and the lens must be just right to be able to focus the light onto the retina. When this is not the case, a refractive error will occur.

There are several different types of refractive errors, depending on which part of the eye is affected, and it is possible to have multiple refractive errors at the same time:

Myopia or nearsightedness:
In myopia the length of the eyeball is too long which results in light coming to a focus in front of the retina, rather than on the retina. This allows the individual to see well when objects are close but not clearly when looking at objects at a distance.

Hyperopia or farsightedness:
Hyperopia is when the eyeball is shorter than normal and can result in near objects being blurry. However, people experience hyperopia differently. Sometimes distant objects are clear while other times people may experience overall blurred vision near and far or no problems at all. In children particularly, the lens may accommodate for the error allowing for clear vision but may cause fatigue and sometimes crossed eyes or strabismus. Hyperopia causes eyestrain or fatigue especially when looking at near objects for a period of time. Often people with 20/20 vision may still need glasses at their desk to relax their eyes and improve concentration.

Astigmatism:
Astigmatism is usually the result of an irregularly shaped cornea (although it can sometimes also be due to a misshapen lens). The cornea, which is normally round, is more football-shaped in an eye with astigmatism, resulting in multiple focus points either in front of the retina or behind it (or both). People with astigmatism usually have blurred or distorted vision to some degree at all distances, near and far.

Presbyopia:
Presbyopia is an age-related condition which usually begins to appear sometime after 40. As the eye begins to age, the lens stiffens and can no longer focus clearly on objects that are close.

It’s important to note that presbyopia is often confused with hyperopia, as both cause problems focusing at near distances. However, high hyperopia can also cause blur at far distances as well, especially in dim lighting, and depth perception problems can result in motor vehicle accidents. In these instances people with hyperopia could use glasses at any distance.
If you are having trouble seeing, it is important to have an eye exam to determine the cause of the problem and to effectively correct your vision. Even if your vision is fine, you should schedule a routine eye exam on a regular basis to ensure that your eyes are healthy and that any potential problems are caught early.

Dry Eye Syndrome: When Dry Eyes are Chronic

Dry eyes are a common problem for many individuals particularly during the winter months when exposure to dry air and whipping wind is increased. However, if you are suffering from dry eyes that just won’t go away, you may have what is known as Dry Eye Syndrome – a condition in which the tears that lubricate and nourish the eye are not being produced sufficiently.

Tears serve to keep the surface of the eye moist, smooth and clear, to reduce the risk of infection and to remove foreign substances. Tear ducts in the corner of the eyelid drain the excess tears. Dry eyes syndrome is a chronic condition characterized by inadequate tear production or poor quality of the tears produced. A number of factors contribute to the condition including advanced age, female gender, environmental conditions, medication or particular medical conditions. Extended periods reading or working on a computer without blinking, prolonged use of contacts or refractive eye surgeries can also contribute to decreased moisture and tear production.

An optometrist will be able to determine whether you have chronic dry eye syndrome by examining your eye and your blinking pattern, measuring the amount and quality of your tears and assessing your medical and environmental history.

Symptoms of Dry Eye Syndrome include:

  • Persistent dry eyes
  • Scratchiness or gritty sensation
  • Burning sensation
  • Feeling like there is something is in your eye
  • Excessively watery eyes
  • Blurred vision

If you are experiencing these symptoms, it is worthwhile to schedule an appointment with your optometrist. If you have dry eye syndrome, there are treatments available to relieve your discomfort.

Computer Glasses: A Growing Necessity in Our Digital World

The need for computer glasses is growing as the digital age means many of us are spending hours in front of a computer or mobile screen each day, often resulting in eye strain, headaches, blurred vision, or neck and shoulder pain. These symptoms and others are often categorized as Computer Vision Syndrome or CVS. Computer eyeglasses are designed to be worn while working on your computer or another small screen to increase physical comfort and reduce eye strain to eliminate these uncomfortable effects of CVS.

What are Computer Glasses?

Computer glasses contain lenses made specifically for viewing a computer screen. Digital screens present a visual field, distance, font and glare that the eyes must accommodate to and therefore individuals that spend more than two hours a day on the computer are susceptible to symptoms of CVS, such as blurred vision and headaches. To avoid eye strain, people tend to compensate by leaning over to get closer to the screen which contributes to neck, back and shoulder pain.

Computer glasses are designed to assist in viewing the screen optimally from a proper position in relation to the computer. As opposed to reading glasses, computer glasses are focused on the intermediate visual zone which is in between distance vision (such as that needed for driving or watching a movie) and near vision (needed when reading). Computer glasses come in single vision, prescription or multifocal lenses depending on the needs of the individual.

It is also important for computer eyeglasses to have an anti-reflective (AR) or anti-glare coating or tint. Such treatments will reduce reflections of light of the computer screen or on the surface of your lenses which can induce eye strain. Some eye doctors also recommend a contrast-enhancing tint for computer glasses to help reduce glare caused by harsh overhead lighting often found in office environments.

Computer vision syndrome can be worsened by underlying vision problems such as accommodating deficiencies – trouble refocusing from the keyboard (near vision) to the screen (intermediate vision) or presbyopia (progressive near vision difficulty that comes with advancing age). Before purchasing computer glasses, you should have a comprehensive eye exam to rule out these or other eye and vision issues which may require an alternative solution.

Where Do I Get Computer Eyeglasses?

Since individual eye and vision needs such as a prescription should be taken into consideration for effective computer glasses, you should schedule an eye exam with a trusted eye care professional. It is also a good idea to measure the distance you generally sit from your computer screen to help your eye doctor determine the optimal power needed for your lens strength. This information will assist your eye doctor in recommending the best lens combination to suit your needs. Remember, these glasses are specifically for computer use only and should not be worn when driving or performing other tasks that require vision enhancement.

Once you are equipped with a proper prescription and lens type, you can select almost any style of frame for your computer glasses, so even sitting at your computer in the office you can look fashionable, see great and feel better at the same time.

Don’t wait for the symptoms of CVS to appear. Particularly if you work at a computer, consult with your optometrist today to find out whether computer glasses are right for you.

Keep An Eye Out For Diabetic Retinopathy

Even many individuals with the disease are not informed that diabetes increases the risk of blindness. Diabetes is the main cause of loss of sight in adults under 75 years old according to recent studies by the NIH. One of the risks of diabetes is retinal damage caused by increased pressure in the blood vessels of the eye, which is called diabetic retinopathy. This condition causes severe vision impairment and even blindness. Anyone with the disease is at risk and it has affected over 3.7 million people in America over the past 10 years.

Early on, this condition often presents no noticeable symptoms. When the pressure in the blood vessels in the retina increases they begin to leak resulting in retinal damage. This will result in vision loss and when not treated, blindness.

Because symptoms are often not seen until vision is already at risk it is important to see your eye doctor annually to perform a comprehensive eye exam if you have diabetes. If you are diabetic and you notice any sort of vision problems, such as fluctuations in eyesight, floaters, double vision, shadows or spots or any pain in your eye make an appointment with an optometrist. In addition to diabetic retinopathy, diabetics are at increased risk of developing cataracts and glaucoma.

The risk of diabetic eye disease is higher when glucose levels are uncontrolled. Carefully monitoring your sugar levels through diet, exercise and staying healthy and yearly eye exams is the best combination for preventing vision loss.

If you or a loved one is diabetic, make sure you are knowledgeable about the risks of diabetic retinopathy and other eye risks and speak to your eye doctor to discuss questions or concerns. In this case, ignorance could cost you your precious eyesight

Contacts, and Glasses, and Drums? Oh My!

 

2004 20BBQ 205

Ever wonder what eye doctors do in their spare time? Well, when Dr. Montemayor is not taking care of his patients, he plays the drums and sings in a band called Easy Money! He has played the drums since he was the age of 4, and enjoys sharing his talent with people whenever he can. Easy Money has actually played at various TSO events, but they are available for private parties and even public events as well. Clink on the link below to find out more! After all, how many people can say their optometrist is a doctor by day and a rock star by night?!

Easy Money Band

Online Patient Registration Forms

You can now request your next appointment online. 

Visit the Contact Us section of our web site and complete the Patient Registration Form.  The form is secure and our office will be notified once the form is complete.  When you walk in for your next appointment, we'll already  have the information entered into our computers.  We're always looking for ways to serve our patients better.

Eyeglasses – Plenty of Great Choices

Eyeglasses Are Back!

Picking out new eyeglasses can be a daunting task, whether you're getting your very first pair or you've worn them nearly all your life. The sheer volume of eyeglass choices can be torture to work your way through if you don't have any idea what you're looking for.

Not only are there many different shapes and colors in eyeglass frames, but advances in technology have also brought us a variety of new materials, for both the frames and the lenses, which makes eyeglasses more durable, lightweight and user-friendly. Eyeglass frames are now created from high-tech materials such as titanium and "memory metal" for the ultimate in strength and style, while the lenses are now thinner and lighter than ever before, even in high prescriptions.

Lens options, such as anti-reflective coating, light-changing tints, progressive lenses and new high-tech, light weight materials such as Trivex(TM) and polycarbonate, let you choose a pair of eyeglasses that enhances your vision, no matter what you like to do.

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